Task 2: Articulating good practice (no more than 2 hours) (badge activity)

 
 
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Inventory of good practice - Mike Mason
by Michael Mason - Monday, 4 May 2015, 9:18 PM
 

Hi

I have attached my initial attempt as a Word document. I found it difficult to know where to stop - almost kept it to thirty lines!

Regards

Mike

Picture of Elizabeth Lovegrove
Re: Inventory of good practice - Mike Mason
by Elizabeth Lovegrove - Tuesday, 5 May 2015, 8:15 AM
 

Thanks, Mike.

I agree -- very easy to keep going writing more and more on this one! It's a good list, and I think you've covered the main areas. A couple of questions:

About the ease of use of the platform: do you think there are any cases where it might be worth the effort of using more 'difficult' technologies, and how might you adapt your processes to make allowances for them?

Tutor response times: any thoughts on the balance between quick tutor responses, and the risk of tutors stifling conversation among participants? 

Liz.

Picture of Michael Mason
Re: Inventory of good practice - Mike Mason
by Michael Mason - Tuesday, 5 May 2015, 8:51 PM
 

Hi Liz and thanks for your thoughts on my inventory. With regard to using more 'difficult' technologies, I can see the case for some subject specific software. In my own subject of real estate management, systems such as computerised mapping technology would be useful. This technology is rather renowned for requiring a fair degree of training!

However, as to using more difficult technology as the learning platform, I have no real experience other than Moodle or Blackboard, both of which seem relatively quite easy to use. My instinct is there would have to be some significant advantages offered by the system to justify the greater investment in familiarity and all the risk that presents to the ease of delivering on line learning. I wonder if others in the group have any examples of using more ambitious technologies.

On tutor response times, I agree it needs to be a judgment appropriate to the circumstances. It is not good for the tutor to 'drown' out what would have been wider student input. I sometimes just thank a student for their contribution and simply invite others to either agree or disagree, for example. If it is a pure technical query, I would personally aim to try and address within 48 hours most of the time,  excluding weekends. Depending on the nature of the exchanges, it might alternatively be appropriate to invite students peers to come forward with what they think is the appropriate response. As discussed in some of the resources, this approach can sometimes help the wider learning in the group - facilitating discourse rather than direct instruction.

Lack of tutor attentiveness/perceived slow response time is one of the more common gripes from students on our programmes and we are urged to be appropriately attentive throughout modules. I do agree however there is an opposing instinctive pressure not to appear overbearing or stifling. I am left feeling you have to judge the appropriate balance, dependent on the group and the subject matter.

Regards

Mike

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Re: Inventory of good practice - Mike Mason
by marion waite - Wednesday, 6 May 2015, 2:26 PM
 

Hi Mike

Great, thank you. As with Elaine's post I am going to suggest that you compare your inventory with at least two others who have posted on the forum.

Marion

Elaine
Re: Inventory of good practice - Mike Mason
by Elaine Ulett - Wednesday, 6 May 2015, 6:59 PM
 

Hi Mike,

Thanks for a very comprehensive inventory. It is interesting that you have incorporated Salmon's 5 stages within your inventory and added more elements to it. Therefore your inventory does not rely on only one of the inventories presented on this course but you felt there had to be additional practices to address other aspects of online tutoring. Were the extra practices based on any other inventory or did you add what you felt was missing?

Elaine

KStaples
Re: Inventory of good practice - Mike Mason
by Katherine Staples - Thursday, 7 May 2015, 4:14 PM
 

Hi Mike

Thank you for being brave and being the first to post - I liked your clear layout and structured points. Like you I also found it hard to keep to 30 lines. I felt there was so much I wanted to include!

In your Good design section you say you want to use the full range of multi-media available to you - in practice are there particular types of media you will choose over others? Would there be any barriers to students accessing and using these?

I loved your commend about the Tutor needing to 'feed' the social presence. I had an image of the keeper feeding the seals! It is hard to strike the right balance between student over-reliance on personal tutor feedback and and continuing the discussion to continue to engage the students. 

Did you notice too, that you have two sections concerning assessment?

Katherine

Picture of Michael Mason
Re: Inventory of good practice - Mike Mason
by Michael Mason - Thursday, 7 May 2015, 7:55 PM
 

Hi Elaine and Katherine, thanks very much for your thoughts on my inventory. If I may I will respond to you both in this message.

The inventory items I set down were a mix of the theories from this course, reflections on my own experience and some helpful points made in the TOOC discussion forums. In choosing a starting point, I found it easiest to work in chronological order through a module or item of learning. That might not have made for the best inventory grouping!

My own personal preference of medium is synchronous webinar. Once you have become familiarised with the technology, I feel it is one of the better platforms for building initial social contact and presence (as we did on TOOC too). If find it is also useful as a follow up activity to subject matter which by its nature has to be rather dry – such as a study paper on the effects of a particular piece of legislation. A webinar following such a study paper can be very useful as a means of ‘bringing the topic to life’ is a more expressive way. My choice here is a bit of a personal one, as I feel I teach more effectively through real time voice than some other media. I also find it a good medium for addressing more difficult points technical points, where several different angles for explaining a point can be given quite quickly, to help students ‘get the point’. As to barriers to access, we have to take account of a number of students we have from Hong Kong, who are 8 hours ahead and this has to be considered when setting webinar times. Bandwidth variation around the world is also a consideration, as is the need to avoid UK centric figures of speech!

The webinars are reasonably popular in Hong Kong, mainly for the ability to playback, than for the live, synchronous time.

Katherine, your analogy of the seals made me laugh! I suppose what I meant more accurately, was that the tutor needs to try and re-create the social presence if for whatever reason it has flagged (if that isn’t a UK centric figure of speech!). I wasn't quite sure about your reference to having two sections on assessment - have I overlooked a duplication?

Mike